Length of Compound Angles

  • Length of Compound Angles

    Posted by Troy DeGroot on May 16, 2024 at 2:02 pm

    I need the linear dimension of a Roof Ridge Vent. seems easy, until you think about it.

    I can’t apply a slope to a line much less a compound line slopped in two directions. Marking up on plan is way off, marking up on elevation only gets me halfway there.

    To complicate things, the slope isn’t consistent, and I’m trying to avoid more custom columns. 😜

    Ideas?

    David Cutler replied 1 week ago 4 Members · 9 Replies
  • 9 Replies
  • Chris Riley

    Member
    May 16, 2024 at 2:32 pm
    Points: 1,199
    Rank: UC2 Brainery Yellow Belt UC2 Brainery Yellow Belt Rank

    Sounds like you are talking about measuring between 2 points in and out of the paper?

    • Troy DeGroot

      Organizer
      May 16, 2024 at 9:45 pm
      Points: 21,336
      Rank: UC2 Brainery Brown Belt I UC2 Brainery Brown Belt I

      Yes Sir. Maybe I’ll just be proud I explained it well enough that you caught it. LOL

  • David Cutler

    Member
    May 16, 2024 at 9:02 pm
    Points: 23,974
    Rank: UC2 Brainery Brown Belt III UC2 Brainery Brown Belt III

    I’d suggest recreating the triangle under the ridge (or valley) over on the side of the drawing using sketch to scale.

    Start by measuring the horizontal length (run) on your plan sheet. Duplicate this length as a horizontal sketch to scale over on the margin. Next capture the “rise” of the roof from an elevation view. Draw this as the vertical leg of your triangle using sketch to scale at the end of your previously drawn horizontal length.

    Now use your “ridge cap tool” to connect the dots creating the 3rd leg of your triangle.

    Takes a couple of steps, but no extra columns are required. 😎

    • Troy DeGroot

      Organizer
      May 16, 2024 at 9:45 pm
      Points: 21,336
      Rank: UC2 Brainery Brown Belt I UC2 Brainery Brown Belt I

      I’ll have to play around with this one David. Thanks for the idea!

      • David Cutler

        Member
        May 21, 2024 at 7:18 am
        Points: 23,974
        Rank: UC2 Brainery Brown Belt III UC2 Brainery Brown Belt III

        Had another thought for you on this @troy-degroot

        This would be a 5 – click method:

        1. Select your custom tool – note that it would need to be a polylength tool

        2. Click on the starting point of the valley/ridge – call this the “A” point

        3. Click on the end of the valley/ridge on the plan view – the “B” point

        4. Extend the measurement line perpendicular to your “AB” line a length equal to the rise to establish your “C” point. Finish the measurement here.

        5. Select the “Subtract Control Point” tool and remove point “B”. This leaves you with the measurement along the slope from “A” to “C”.

        I’ve been using a similar process recently when I need to offset at line – say for paving restoration along a curbline. I start on the curbline (my “A” point), move out the specified distance (“B” point), place my next point along the curb at a direction change (“C1” point), then move out the specified distance perpendicular to the line at the “C1” point to establish my “D1” point and then continue along establishing a series of “Cx” and “Dx” points. Once I’ve gotten to then end of the measurement I select the “Subtract Control Point” tool and delete the “C” points. What is left behind is offset from my baseline consistently by the distance between the “C” and “D” points. This also works with area tools, but you have to pick your return pass points carefully to avoid crossing the measurement lines…

        This take some practice, but avoids having to create multiple offset lines…

        • Vince

          Member
          May 22, 2024 at 1:16 am
          Points: 12,145
          Rank: UC2 Brainery Blue Belt II UC2 Brainery Blue Belt II

          Have you got a screenshot of what you are doing in your example @David Cutler ?

          • David Cutler

            Member
            May 22, 2024 at 7:07 am
            Points: 23,974
            Rank: UC2 Brainery Brown Belt III UC2 Brainery Brown Belt III

            Hopefully these will help @Vince

            In this example I want to measure a sawcut 2 foot off of a curb line. Basically follow the steps as outlined above. It takes a few steps and looks a bit choppy when I’m zoomed in this tight, but it works.

            🙂

  • David Cutler

    Member
    May 16, 2024 at 10:08 pm
    Points: 23,974
    Rank: UC2 Brainery Brown Belt III UC2 Brainery Brown Belt III

    Glad to plant a seed @troy-degroot ! Looking forward to hearing what you come up with.

    You could take this a step further and create a separate takeoff sheet for ridges and valleys using grid lines. Simply start your tool at a “zero point”, move over your run distance (don’t click on it!) and then up your rise distance and complete the measurement. Easy-peassy!

  • Vince

    Member
    May 17, 2024 at 1:40 am
    Points: 12,145
    Rank: UC2 Brainery Blue Belt II UC2 Brainery Blue Belt II

    I had this problem when I started looking at roofing timbers @Troy. Although, Revu has the cos and tan functions available for use in formulas, I couldn’t find a way to get these to work.

    I think that is when I first looked at power query – sorry!

    My set up is now quite simple – measure the length of the valley rafter on plan and assign two angles – one for the pitch of the roof and another for the angle away from the main rafters.

    Export the markup list to a csv and then let Excel do the rest.

Log in to reply.